Mapping Seabird Sensitivity to Offshore Wind Farms

Journal Article

Title: Mapping Seabird Sensitivity to Offshore Wind Farms
Publication Date:
September 11, 2014
Journal: Plos One
Volume: 9
Issue: 9
Pages: 1-17
Publisher: Plos One
Sponsoring Organization:
Receptor:

Document Access

Website: External Link
Attachment: Access File
(4 MB)

Citation

Bradbury, G.; Trinder, M.; Furness, B.; Banks, A.; Caldow, R.; Hume, D. (2014). Mapping Seabird Sensitivity to Offshore Wind Farms. Plos One, 9(9), 1-17.
Abstract: 

We present a Geographic Information System (GIS) tool, SeaMaST (Seabird Mapping and Sensitivity Tool), to provide evidence on the use of sea areas by seabirds and inshore waterbirds in English territorial waters, mapping their relative sensitivity to offshore wind farms. SeaMaST is a freely available evidence source for use by all connected to the offshore wind industry and will assist statutory agencies in assessing potential risks to seabird populations from planned developments. Data were compiled from offshore boat and aerial observer surveys spanning the period 1979-2012. The data were analysed using distance analysis and Density Surface Modelling to produce predicted bird densities across a grid covering English territorial waters at a resolution of 3 km×3 km. Coefficients of Variation were estimated for each grid cell density, as an indication of confidence in predictions. Offshore wind farm sensitivity scores were compiled for seabird species using English territorial waters. The comparative risks to each species of collision with turbines and displacement from operational turbines were reviewed and scored separately, and the scores were multiplied by the bird density estimates to produce relative sensitivity maps. The sensitivity maps reflected well the amassed distributions of the most sensitive species. SeaMaST is an important new tool for assessing potential impacts on seabird populations from offshore development at a time when multiple large areas of development are proposed which overlap with many seabird species' ranges. It will inform marine spatial planning as well as identifying priority areas of sea usage by marine birds. Example SeaMaST outputs are presented.

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