Unforeseen Responses of a Breeding Seabird to the Construction of an Offshore Wind Farm

Book Chapter

Title: Unforeseen Responses of a Breeding Seabird to the Construction of an Offshore Wind Farm
Publication Date:
February 03, 2017
Book Title: Wind Energy and Wildlife Interactions
Chapter: 2
Pages: 19-41
Publisher: Springer
Stressor:
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Document Access

Website: External Link

Citation

Harwood, A.; Perrow, M.; Berridge, R.; Tomlinson, M.; Skeate, E. (2017). Unforeseen Responses of a Breeding Seabird to the Construction of an Offshore Wind Farm. Wind Energy and Wildlife Interactions (pp. 19-41). Springer.
Abstract: 

Sheringham Shoal Offshore Wind Farm (OWF), comprised of 88 3.6 MW turbines, was built within foraging range of Sandwich Tern Thalasseus sandvicensis breeding at a European designated site. Boat-based surveys (n = 43) were used to investigate changes in tern abundance within the site and within 0–2 and 2–4 km buffer areas before and throughout the construction of the OWF, over a study period between 2009 and 2012. Visual tracking of individual birds (n = 840) was also undertaken to document any changes in behaviour. This study is amongst the few to detail the response of a breeding seabird to the construction of an OWF. Navigational buoys in the 0–2 km buffer were used extensively by resting and socialising birds, especially early in the breeding season. Visual tracking illustrated avoidance of areas of construction activity and birds surprisingly kept their distance from installed monopiles. Avoidance was strengthened during turbine assembly, with around 30% fewer birds entering the wind farm, relative to the pre-construction baseline. Flight lines of birds that entered the site were generally along the centre of rows between turbines. A focus on transit flight meant that feeding activity was lower in the site than the buffer areas. As the site remained permeable to terns flying to and from foraging grounds further offshore, the overall abundance within the site was not significantly reduced. Although a number of the responses observed were unforeseen by Environmental Impact Assessment, the overall conclusion of only minor adverse effects was upheld. Analysis of further data from the operational site is now planned.

 

This is a chapter from Wind Energy and Wildlife Interactions.

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