A Unifying Framework for the Underlying Mechanisms of Avian Avoidance of Wind Turbines

Journal Article

Title: A Unifying Framework for the Underlying Mechanisms of Avian Avoidance of Wind Turbines
Authors: May, R.
Publication Date:
October 01, 2015
Journal: Biological Conservation
Volume: 190
Pages: 179-187
Publisher: Elsevier
Stressor:
Receptor:
Interactions:
Technology Type:

Document Access

Website: External Link

Citation

May, R. (2015). A Unifying Framework for the Underlying Mechanisms of Avian Avoidance of Wind Turbines. Biological Conservation, 190, 179-187.
Abstract: 

The construction and operation of wind-power plants may affect birds through collision mortality, reduced habitat utilization due to disturbance, barriers to movement and habitat modifications, with the nature and magnitude of those effects being site- and species-specific. Birds may however manage these effects through fleeing, activity shifts or changed habitat utilization; usually termed avoidance. Given the important role avoidance plays in estimating the impact wind-power development has on birds, there is a pressing need to formalizing the avoidance process. Crucial in this context is to identify the underlying mechanisms of behavioural responses by birds to wind-power plants and individual turbines. To provide a better basis for and improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms for avoidance a conceptual framework for wind-turbine avoidance is presented decomposing various forms of avoidance at different spatial scales. Avoidance behaviour includes displacement (macro-avoidance), anticipatory and impulsive evasion (meso-avoidance), and escape (micro-avoidance). For understanding why particular responses occur with regard to wind-turbine disturbance this concept is applied to predation risk theory. The risk-disturbance hypothesis elucidates possible trade-offs between avoiding perceived risk and fitness-enhancing activities. The four behavioural responses are related to, respectively, habitat selection, vigilance and fleeing (twice); from which specific predictions can be derived. Formalizing the different forms of avoidance facilitates design of effects studies, enhances comparisons among sites studied, and guide siting and mitigation strategies.

Find Tethys on InstagramFind Tethys on FacebookFind Tethys on Twitter
 
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.