Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) Response to Wind Energy Development on Winter Range in South-Central, Wyoming

Thesis

Title: Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) Response to Wind Energy Development on Winter Range in South-Central, Wyoming
Authors: Taylor, K.
Publication Date:
May 01, 2014
Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
Academic Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Pages: 140
Affiliation:

Document Access

Website: External Link

Citation

Taylor, K. (2014). Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) Response to Wind Energy Development on Winter Range in South-Central, Wyoming. Master's Thesis, University of Wyoming.
Abstract: 

Energy development, urbanization and agriculture, have brought about several changes to pronghorn habitats. Development of roads, fences, buildings, and energy infrastructure not only modifies the appearance of the landscape, but also has potential to change the function and stability of local wildlife populations. For example, pronghorn have evolved specialized limbs built for speed and their physiology does not adequately afford them the ability to jump fences (Byers 1997). Inadequacies to jump fences result in direct mortalities as well as avoidance of fenced areas (Sheldon 2006). Pronghorn are already constrained by food deprivation, thermodynamics, and energetic limitations on winter range. Additional anthropogenic disturbance to pronghorn winter range may result in negative impacts to populations during construction or production phases. Evaluating these impacts can lead to improved mitigation measures that lessen pressures for pronghorn on crucial winter range.

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