Repeated Elicitation of the Acoustic Startle Reflex Leads to Sensitisation in Subsequent Avoidance Behaviour and Induces Fear Conditioning

Journal Article

Title: Repeated Elicitation of the Acoustic Startle Reflex Leads to Sensitisation in Subsequent Avoidance Behaviour and Induces Fear Conditioning
Authors: Janik, V.; Götz, T.
Publication Date:
April 13, 2011
Journal: BMC Neuroscience
Volume: 12
Issue: 30
Pages: 1-13
Publisher: BioMed Central
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Document Access

Website: External Link
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Citation

Janik, V.; Götz, T. (2011). Repeated Elicitation of the Acoustic Startle Reflex Leads to Sensitisation in Subsequent Avoidance Behaviour and Induces Fear Conditioning. BMC Neuroscience, 12(30), 1-13.
Abstract: 

Autonomous reflexes enable animals to respond quickly to potential threats, prevent injury and mediate fight or flight responses. Intense acoustic stimuli with sudden onsets elicit a startle reflex while stimuli of similar intensity but with longer rise times only cause a cardiac defence response. In laboratory settings, habituation appears to affect all of these reflexes so that the response amplitude generally decreases with repeated exposure to the stimulus. The startle reflex has become a model system for the study of the neural basis of simple learning processes and emotional processing and is often used as a diagnostic tool in medical applications. However, previous studies did not allow animals to avoid the stimulus and the evolutionary function and long-term behavioural consequences of repeated startling remain speculative. In this study we investigate the follow-up behaviour associated with the startle reflex in wild-captured animals using an experimental setup that allows individuals to exhibit avoidance behaviour.

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