Marine Renewable Energy, Electromagnetic (EM) Fields and EM-Sensitive Animals

Book Chapter

Title: Marine Renewable Energy, Electromagnetic (EM) Fields and EM-Sensitive Animals
Publication Date:
February 13, 2014
Book Title: Marine Renewable Energy Technology and Environmental Interactions
Chapter: 6
Pages: 61-79
Publisher: Springer
Stressor:
Technology Type:

Document Access

Website: External Link

Citation

Gill, A.; Gloyne-Philips, I.; Kimber, J.; Sigray, P. (2014). Marine Renewable Energy, Electromagnetic (EM) Fields and EM-Sensitive Animals. Marine Renewable Energy Technology and Environmental Interactions (pp. 61-79). Springer.
Abstract: 

In the marine environment there are natural magnetic and electric fields associated with both physical and biological sources, and there are anthropogenic electromagnetic fields (EMFs) that permeate it. Many marine animals can detect electric and magnetic fields and utilize them in such important life processes as movement, orientation and foraging. Here, these EMFs are explored and discussed in terms of how they arise, their properties (particularly those that are measurable) and the animals that have the ability to detect them. Then the evidence base for whether anthropogenic EMFs can affect sensitive receptor animals is explored. As marine renewable energy developments (MREDs) expand rapidly worldwide, with multiple devices and networks of subsea cables that emit EMFs into the marine environment, it is necessary to focus on their interaction with marine animals. The MRED industry has to take EMFs into account, so the industry perspective is also covered. Finally, suggestions are made on how research on EMFs associated with MREDs (and other sources) and its interaction with marine animals should advance in future.

 

This is a chapter from Humanity and the Sea: Marine Renewable Energy Technology and Environmental Interactions.

Find Tethys on FacebookFind Tethys on Twitter
 
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.