Additional Papers from the 10th International Congress on Marine Corrosion and Fouling

Conference Paper

Title: Additional Papers from the 10th International Congress on Marine Corrosion and Fouling
Publication Date:
February 01, 1999
Conference Name: 10th International Congress on Marine Corrosion and Fouling
Conference Location: University of Melbourne, Austalia
Pages: 267
Affiliation:
Receptor:

Document Access

Website: External Link
Attachment: Access File
(7 MB)

Citation

Defence Science & Technology Imagination (DSTO) (1999). Additional Papers from the 10th International Congress on Marine Corrosion and Fouling. Paper Presented at the 10th International Congress on Marine Corrosion and Fouling, University of Melbourne, Austalia.
Abstract: 

This volume contains nineteen papers from the 10th International Congress on Marine Corrosion and Fouling, held at the University of Melbourne in Melbourne, Australia, in February 1999. The scope of the congress was to enhance scientific understanding of the processes and prevention of chemical and biological degradation of materials in the sea. Papers in this volume range across the themes of marine biofilms and bioadhesion, macrofouling processes and effects, methods for prevention of marine fouling, biocides in the marine environment, biodeterioration of wood in the sea, and marine corrosion

 

Executive Summary

 

The fouling and corrosion of vessels and structures immersed in the sea continues to pose significant economic and operational costs to the owner. Fouling growth can interfere with the operation of submerge d equipment, impose increased loading stresses and accelerate corrosion on marine structures, and adversely affect the performance of ships by increasing hydro dynamic drag, which necessitates the use of more power and fuel to move the ship thro ugh the water. Similarly, marine corrosion and biodegradation of materials can compromise the operation and structural integrity of vessels, structures and other immersed equipment. To enhance protection against fouling and corrosion would generate significant savings in both the maintenance and operation of maritime platforms and equipment.

 

The first International Congress on Marine Corrosion and Fouling was held in France in 1964, and the Congress has continued to be held at approximately four year intervals since. Over this time the Congress has become the foremost international scientific conference on the chemical and biological degradation of materials in the sea, and brings together scientists from academia, industry, defence and other government organisations to present and discuss recent scientific developments in understanding and combating the degradation of materials, structures and the performance of vessels in the marine environment.

 

The inaugural U.S./Pacific Rim Workshop on Emerging Non-Metallic Materials for the Marine Environment was held in Hawaii in 1997. Recognising the increasing pressures to reduce the costs of building and operating ships and the need to reduce or eliminate materials potentially toxic to shipbuilders, ships’ crews, and the environment, the workshop was organised to highlight the problems to be solved, the new materials available to address these needs, and areas where further research was needed.

 

The 10th International Congress on Marine Corrosion and Fouling, and the 2nd U.S./Pacific Rim Workshop on Emerging Non-Metallic Materials for the Marine Environment, were brought together at the University of Melbourne, in Melbourne, Australia, in February 1999. Close to 200 delegates from 24 countries attended, and 118 papers were presented in sessions on Biofilms and Bioadhesion, Chemical Mediation of Fouling in Natural Systems, Macrofouling and Macrofouling Processes, Prevention of Fouling, Regulation of Antifouling Practices, Antifouling Biocides in the Environment, Transport of Marine Species on Ship Hulls, Biodeterioration of Wood, and Marine Corrosion and Corrosion Control.

 

Twenty-two selected papers form the congress were published in a special issue of the journal Biofouling in June 2000. An additional 19 papers are presented in this publication.

 

Contents

 

 

  1. PREFACE
  2. BIOFILMS & BIOADHESION
    1. Nano-indentation Measurements of the Marine Bacteria Sphingomonas paucimobilis using the Atomic Force Microscope
  3. MACROFOULING PROCESSES
    1. Macrofouling Role of Mussels in Italian Seas: A Short Review
    2. Macrofouling of an Oceanographic Buoy in the Ligurian Sea (Western Mediterranean)
    3. Effects of Fouling Organisms on the Water Quality of a Nuclear Power Plant Cooling System
  4. PREVENTION OF FOULING
    1. Controlling Biofouling on Ferry Hulls with Copper-Nickel Sheathing
    2. Antifouling from Nature: Laboratory Test with Balanus amphitrite Darwin on Algae and Sponges
    3. Electromagnetic Antifouling Shield (EMAS) - A Promising Novel Antifouling Technique for Optical Systems
    4. Properties of a Titanium Nitride Electrode and its Application for Electrochemical Prevention of Marine Biofouling
    5. Electrochemical Prevention of Diatom Adhesion and Direct Estimation of Diatom Viability using TO-PRO-1 Iodide
    6. Development of a New Antifouling Paint Based on a Novel Zinc Acrylate Copolymer
  5. ANTIFOULING BIOCIDES IN THE ENVIRONMENT
    1. The Legacy of 110 Years of Dockyard Operations
    2. The Effects of Changes in Environmental Parameters on the Release of Organic Booster Biocides from Antifouling Coatings
  6. BIODETERIORATION OF WOOD
    1. Recent Marine Wood Preservation Research in Australia
    2. Copper-Chromium-Arsenic Levels in Barnacles Growing on Timber Marine Piles
  7. MARINE CORROSION & CORROSION CONTROL
    1. Probabilistic Modelling of Marine Immersion Corrosion of Steels
    2. Physico-Chemical Modelling for the Prediction of Seawater Metal Corrosion
    3. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments in Marine Environments: An Overview
    4. Rapid Assessment of the Crevice Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steel Alloys in Seawater
    5. Electrochemical Control of Fouling and Corrosion in a Mooring System for Use in Ecologically-Sensitive Sea Areas
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