Annex IV distributes metadata forms (questionnaires) to solicit information from developers involved in environmental monitoring around marine renewable energy project sites around the world. This page provides project descriptions, baseline assessment, post-installation monitoring, and links to available data and reports. Content is updated on an annual basis.

Annapolis Tidal Station

Project Site Annex IV

Title: Annapolis Tidal Station
Developer:
Start Date:
January 01, 1984
Country:
Technology Type:
Info Updated:
March 01, 2018
Annapolis in-stream tidal barrage
Project Status: 
Device in operation
Technology: 
Tidal Barrage
Project Scale: 
Commercial
Installed Capacity: 
20 MW
Description: 

The Annapolis Tidal Power Plant came online in 1984. The turbine is a single effect 7.6 m diameter horizontal axis Straflow turbine designed to generate power during discharge from the reservoir into the sea. It has a capacity of 20 megawatts and a daily output of roughly 80-100 megawatt hours, depending on the tides.

Location: 

Located in the Bay of Fundy and Annapolis River, near Granville’s Ferry and Annapolis Royal, Canada.

Process Status: 

In 1980 Nova Scotia Power started construction on Hogg Island at the mouth of the Annapolis River as a federal and provincial government pilot project. Four years later the construction was complete and the station began operation. It is currently the third largest tidal barrage in the world.

Licensing Information: 

The Annapolis Tidal Generating Station generates electricity from tidal flows in the Bay of Fundy, and operates in full compliance with all regulatory requirements (i.e. Fisheries Act). Although Annapolis Tidal maintains operating agreements with DFO, no formal Operating Approval exists for Annapolis Tidal with Nova Scotia Environment (NSE), as the facility operates in federal jurisdiction solely.

Key Environmental Issues: 

EIA included release of suspended sediment, scour in existing channels and at adjacent shorelines, flood flow management, and passage of anadromous fish through the barrage. Concerns with increased basin water levels included interference with existing agriculture, flooding, and accelerated rates of bank erosion.

 

While effectively generating electricity, the blocking of water flow by the dam (to allow the tidal difference to accumulate every six hours) has caused a slight increase in river bank erosion on both the upstream and downstream ends. The dam also has the potential to trap some marine life. Two notable cases occurred in:

  • August 2004: a mature Humpback whale (nicknamed Sluice) swam through the open sluice gate at slack tide, ending up trapped for several days in the upper part of the river before eventually finding its way out to the Annapolis Basin.
  • Spring 2007: When a body of an immature Humpback whale was discovered near the head of tide in the river at Bridgetown. A post-mortem was inconclusive but suggested the whale had become trapped in the river after following fish through the sluice gates.
Annapolis Tidal Station is located in Canada.

Post-Installation Monitoring: Annapolis Tidal Station

General Description:

Environmental Impact Assessment results. Monitoring plans post deployment.

ReceptorMonitoring Program Description Design and Methods Results Status
  • Physical Environment

Release of suspended sediment, scour in existing channels and at adjacent shorelines, flood flow management.

N/A

N/A

N/A
  • Fish and Fisheries

Passage of anadromous fish through the barrage.

N/A

N/A

N/A
  • Other

Increased basin water levels included interference with existing agriculture, flooding, and accelerated rates of bank erosion.

N/A

N/A

N/A
  • Marine Mammals

N/A

N/A

August 2004: a mature Humpback whale (nicknamed Sluice) swam through the open sluice gate at slack tide, ending up trapped for several days in the upper part of the river before eventually finding its way out to the Annapolis Basin.

Spring 2007: When a body of an immature Humpback whale was discovered near the head of tide in the river at Bridgetown. A post-mortem was inconclusive but suggested the whale had become trapped in the river after following fish through the sluice gates.

N/A
Reports and Papers
Research N/A
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