The Effect of Wind-Generated Bubbles on Sea-Surface Backscattering at 940 Hz

Journal Article

Title: The Effect of Wind-Generated Bubbles on Sea-Surface Backscattering at 940 Hz
Publication Date:
November 01, 2011
Journal: The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume: 130
Number: 5
Pages: 3413-3420
Affiliation:
Stressor:

Document Access

Website: External Link

Citation

van Vossen, R.; Ainslie, M. (2011). The Effect of Wind-Generated Bubbles on Sea-Surface Backscattering at 940 Hz. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 130, 3413-3420.
Abstract: 

Reliable predictions of sea-surface backscattering strength are required for sonar performance modeling. These are, however, difficult to obtain as measurements of sea-surface backscattering are not available at small grazing angles relevant to low-frequency active sonar (1-3 kHz). Accurate theoretical predictions of scattering strength require a good understanding of physical mechanisms giving rise to the scattering and the relative importance of these. In this paper, scattering from individual resonant bubbles is introduced as a potential mechanism and a scattering model is derived that incorporates the contribution from these together with that of rough surface scattering. The model results are fitted to Critical Sea Test (CST) measurements at a frequency of 940 Hz, treating the number of large bubbles, parameterized through the spectral slope of the size spectrum for bubbles whose radii exceed 1 mm, as a free parameter. This procedure illustrates that the CST data can be explained by scattering from a small number of large resonant bubbles, indicating that these provide an alternative mechanism to that of scattering from bubble clouds.

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