Risk of whale encounters with offshore renewable energy mooring lines and electrical cables

Presentation

Title: Risk of whale encounters with offshore renewable energy mooring lines and electrical cables
Publication Date:
April 25, 2018
Conference Name: Environmental Interactions of Marine Renewables 2018
Conference Location: Kirkwall, Orkney, Scotland, UK
Pages: 14
Stressor:
Interactions:

Document Access

Attachment: Access File
(5 MB)

Citation

Copping, A.; Grear, M.; Sanders, G. (2018). Risk of whale encounters with offshore renewable energy mooring lines and electrical cables [Presentation]. Presented at the Environmental Interactions of Marine Renewables 2018, Kirkwall, Orkney, Scotland, UK.
Abstract: 

Surface-placed wave energy converters, floating tidal turbines, and floating offshore wind platforms all require anchoring to the seabed with multiple mooring lines and electrical cables passing through the water column, from near the sea surface to the sea floor. Concerns have been raised that large whales may collide with and/or become entangled in lines and cables from renewable energy installations, causing injury or death. Currently, there are few floating arrays where this encounter can be tested, and no appropriate industrial analogues that can be applied. Using literature values for humpback swimming behavior, diving speed, dive duration, foraging behavior, as well as specifications for a generic floating marine energy array, we have modeled the passage of the whales through the array. Using animation software, we have visualized the passage of an adult-calf pair through the array, as well as the foraging behavior of an adult humpback. From this animation, we hope to gain insight and provide visual context for the risk of large whales and offshore mooring lines and cables.

 

More information about the EIMR 2018 Conference is available here.

Find Tethys on InstagramFind Tethys on FacebookFind Tethys on Twitter
 
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.