A review of crustacean sensitivity to high amplitude underwater noise: Data needs for effective risk assessment in relation to UK commercial species

Journal Article

Title: A review of crustacean sensitivity to high amplitude underwater noise: Data needs for effective risk assessment in relation to UK commercial species
Publication Date:
July 01, 2016
Journal: Marine Pollution Bulletin
Volume: 108
Issue: 1-2
Pages: 5-11
Publisher: Elsevier
Stressor:

Document Access

Website: External Link
Attachment: Access File
(317 KB)

Citation

Edmonds, N.; Firmin, C.; Goldsmith, D.; Faulkner, R.; Wood, T. (2016). A review of crustacean sensitivity to high amplitude underwater noise: Data needs for effective risk assessment in relation to UK commercial species. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 108(1-2), 5-11.
Abstract: 

High amplitude anthropogenic noise is associated with adverse impacts among a variety of organisms but detailed species-specific knowledge is lacking in relation to effects upon crustaceans. Brown crab (Cancer pagurus), European lobster (Homarus gammarus) and Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) together represent the most valuable commercial fishery in the UK (Defra, 2014). Critical evaluation of literature reveals physiological sensitivity to underwater noise among N. norvegicus and closely related crustacean species, including juvenile stages. Current evidence supports physiological sensitivity to local, particle motion effects of sound production in particular. Derivation of correlative relationships between the introduction of high amplitude impulsive noise and crustacean distribution/abundance is hindered by the coarse resolution of available data at the present time. Future priorities for research are identified and argument for enhanced monitoring under current legislative frameworks outlined.

 

Highlights:

  • Marine crustaceans detect, produce and respond to sound.
  • Crustacean sound sensitivity is restricted to particle motion.
  • Sound sensitivity of commercial UK crustaceans is unknown.
  • Licencing bodies do not capture detailed spatio-temporal noise introduction data.
  • Landings cannot be correlated with sound introduction given course data resolution.
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