Measuring Changes in Ambient Noise Levels from the Installation and Operation of a Surge Wave Energy Converter in the Coastal Ocean

Report

Title: Measuring Changes in Ambient Noise Levels from the Installation and Operation of a Surge Wave Energy Converter in the Coastal Ocean
Authors: Henkel, S.; Haxel, J.
Publication Date:
October 18, 2017
Document Number: DOE-OSUHMSC-0006387
Pages: 17
Sponsoring Organization:
Stressor:
Technology Type:

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Website: External Link
Attachment: Access File
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Citation

Henkel, S.; Haxel, J. (2017). Measuring Changes in Ambient Noise Levels from the Installation and Operation of a Surge Wave Energy Converter in the Coastal Ocean. Report by Oregon State University. pp 17.
Abstract: 

Ecosystem impacts resulting from elevated underwater noise levels generated by anthropogenic activities in the coastal ocean are poorly understood and remain difficult to address as a result of a significant gap in knowledge for existing nearshore sound levels. Ambient noise is an important habitat component for marine mammals and fish that use sound for essential functions such as communication, navigation, and foraging. Questions surrounding the amplitudes, frequency distributions, and durations of noise emissions from renewable wave energy conversion (WEC) projects during their construction and operation present concerns for long-term consequences in marine habitats. Oregon’s dynamic nearshore environment presents significant challenges for passive acoustic monitoring that include flow noise contamination from wave orbital motions, turbulence from breaking surf, equipment burial, and fishing pressure from sport and commercial crabbers. This project included 2 techniques for passive acoustic data collection: 1) campaign style deployments of fixed hydrophone lander stations to capture temporal variations in noise levels and 2) a drifting hydrophone system to record spatial variations within the project site. The hydrophone lander deployments were effective and economically feasible for enabling robust temporal measurements of ambient noise levels in a variety of sea state conditions. Limiting factors for the fixed stations included 1) a flow shield mitigation strategy failure in the first deployment resulting in significant wideband data contamination and 2) flow noise contamination of the unshielded sensors restricting valuable analysis to frequencies above 500 Hz for subsequent deployments. Drifting hydrophone measurements were also effective and economically feasible (although logistically challenging in the beginning of the project due to vessel time constraints) providing a spatial distribution of sound levels, comparisons of noise levels in varying levels of vessel traffic during similar sea states, and reducing the frequencies contaminated by flow noise to f < 50 Hz by an effective drifting hydrophone system design strategy. Results from this project can still assist regulatory agencies and WEC developers in permitting and licensing, reducing project costs overall and assisting the economic development of the WEC industry, thus furthering the MHK energy industry and easing the U.S. reliance on foreign oil for energy production. Additionally, results from this project can be used to help inform coastal resource managers and regulatory agencies on existing baseline noise level variability and ecosystem health.

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