Foraging Range and Habitat use by Cape Vulture Gyps coprotheres from the Msikaba Colony, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

Journal Article

Title: Foraging Range and Habitat use by Cape Vulture Gyps coprotheres from the Msikaba Colony, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa
Publication Date:
May 18, 2015
Journal: Koedoe
Volume: 57
Issue: 1
Pages: 1-11
Publisher: AOSIS Publishing

Document Access

Website: External Link
Attachment: Access File
(4 MB)

Citation

Pfeiffer, M.; Venter, J.; Downs, C. (2015). Foraging Range and Habitat use by Cape Vulture Gyps coprotheres from the Msikaba Colony, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Koedoe, 57(1), 1-11.
Abstract: 

Despite the extent of subsistence farmland in Africa, little is known about endangered species that persist within them. The Cape Vulture (Gyps coprotheres) is regionally endangered in southern Africa and at least 20% of the population breeds in the subsistence farmland area previously known as the Transkei in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa. To understand their movement ecology, adult Cape Vultures (n = 9) were captured and fitted with global positioning system/global system for mobile transmitters. Minimum convex polygons (MCPs), and 99% and 50% kernel density estimates (KDEs) were calculated for the breeding and non-breeding seasons of the Cape Vulture. Land use maps were constructed for each 99% KDE and vulture locations were overlaid. During the non-breeding season, ranges were slightly larger (mean [+ SE] MCP = 16 887 km2+ 366 km2) than the breeding season (MCP = 14 707 km2 + 2155 km2). Breeding and non-breeding season MCPs overlapped by a total of 92%. Kernel density estimates showed seasonal variability. During the breeding season, Cape Vultures used subsistence farmland, natural woodland and protected areas more than expected. In the non-breeding season, vultures used natural woodland and subsistence farmland more than expected, and protected areas less than expected. In both seasons, human-altered landscapes were used less, except for subsistence farmland.

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