Far-Field and Near-Field Effects of Marine Aquaculture

Book Chapter

Title: Far-Field and Near-Field Effects of Marine Aquaculture
Publication Date:
January 01, 2019
Book Title: World Seas: an Environmental Evaluation (Second Edition) Volume III: Ecological Issues and Environmental Impacts
Volume: 3
Chapter: 11
Pages: 197-220
Publisher: Elsevier Ltd.
Affiliation:

Document Access

Website: External Link

Citation

Weitzman, J.; Steeves, L.; Bradford, J.; Filgueira, R. (2019). Far-Field and Near-Field Effects of Marine Aquaculture. World Seas: an Environmental Evaluation (Second Edition) Volume III: Ecological Issues and Environmental Impacts (pp. 197-220). Elsevier Ltd.
Abstract: 

Aquaculture for finfish, bivalves, and seaweed is an important and growing food producing sector globally. However, culturing of species in the marine environment implies multiple interactions between farmed species and their environment. This has led to concerns over the ecological effects of aquaculture, which include benthic organic loading, changes to water quality, habitat modification, disease spread, and introduction of exotic or invasive species, interaction with wild species, coastal eutrophication, and marine litter. Over the years, governments and international organizations have recognized the need to identify, mitigate, and reduce these ecological effects. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations proposes an Ecosystem Approach to Aquaculture (EAA), which implies recognizing its effects at multiple spatial scales, including near-field effect (farm scale) and far-field (bay scale and global scale) effect. This chapter reviews ecological effects of finfish, bivalve, and seaweed aquaculture in marine coastal waters, and describes the mitigation efforts currently used to improve its sustainable management.

 

Book: World Seas: an Environmental Evaluation (Second Edition) Volume III: Ecological Issues and Environmental Impacts

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