Attraction To and Avoidance of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines by Freshwater Aquatic Organisms

Report

Title: Attraction To and Avoidance of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines by Freshwater Aquatic Organisms
Publication Date:
May 01, 2011
Document Number: ORNL/TM-2011/131
Pages: 43
Sponsoring Organization:
Stressor:
Receptor:
Interactions:
Technology Type:

Document Access

Website: External Link
Attachment: Access File
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Citation

Cada, G.; Bevelhimer, M. (2011). Attraction To and Avoidance of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines by Freshwater Aquatic Organisms. Report by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). pp 43.
Abstract: 

The development of hydrokinetic (HK) energy projects is under consideration at over 150 sites in large rivers in the United States, including the Mississippi, Ohio, Tennessee, and Atchafalaya Rivers. These waterbodies support numerous fish species that might interact with the HK projects in a variety of ways, e.g., by attraction to or avoidance of project structures. Although many fish species inhabit these rivers (about 172 species in the Mississippi River alone), not all of them will encounter the HK projects. Some species prefer low-velocity, backwater habitats rather than the high-velocity, main channel areas that would be the best sites for HK. Other, riverbank-oriented species are weak swimmers or too small to inhabit the main channel for significant periods of time. Some larger, main channel fish species are not known to be attracted to structures. Based on a consideration of habitat preferences, size/swim speed, and behavior, fish species that are most likely to be attracted to HK structures in the main channel include carps, suckers, catfish, white bass, striped bass, smallmouth bass, spotted bass, and sauger. Proper siting of the project in order to avoid sensitive fish populations, backwater and fish nursery habitat areas, and fish migration corridors will likely minimize concerns about fish attraction to or avoidance of HK structures.

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