Assessment And Prediction Of Bird And Bat Mortality At Wind Energy Facilities In The Southeastern United States

Report

Title: Assessment And Prediction Of Bird And Bat Mortality At Wind Energy Facilities In The Southeastern United States
Publication Date:
January 01, 2005
Pages: 65
Receptor:

Document Access

Website: External Link
Attachment: Access File
(725 KB)

Citation

Nicholson, C.; Tankersley, R. Jr.; Fielder, J.; Nicholas, N. (2005). Assessment And Prediction Of Bird And Bat Mortality At Wind Energy Facilities In The Southeastern United States. Report by Tennessee Valley Authority. pp 65.
Abstract: 

Mortality of birds at windfarms has been an area of concern since the first commercial windfarms were constructed in the 1970s. More recently, concern over bat mortality at windfarms has emerged. Studies of avian and bat mortality from midwestern and western North America show regional variation in mortality rates and species affected. We describe the results of a study of bird and bat activity and mortality at the Tennessee Valley Authority's 3-turbine Buffalo Mountain Windfarm in eastern Tennessee, the first commercial windfarm in the southeastern United States.

 

Mortality of both birds and bats was determined by regular carcass searches from the fall of 2000, when the windfarm began commercial operation, through the fall of 2003. Avian activity was determined by visual observations of migrating raptors during the fall of 2001, by mist-netting birds during the fall of 2001 and 2002, and by analysis of regional migration as detected by NEXRAD radar imagery during the spring and fall of 2001 and 2002. Efforts to monitor nocturnal bird migration through the area with acoustic recording equipment were unsuccessful. Bat activity was determined by the continuous operation of electronic bat detectors and by periodic mist-netting in the windfarm area.

Find Tethys on InstagramFind Tethys on FacebookFind Tethys on Twitter
 
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.