OES-Environmental distributes metadata forms (questionnaires) to solicit information from developers involved in environmental monitoring around marine renewable energy project sites around the world. This page provides project descriptions, baseline assessment, post-installation monitoring, and links to available data and reports. Content is updated on an annual basis.

Fundy Ocean Research Center for Energy (FORCE) Test Site

Project Site OES-Environmental

Title: Fundy Ocean Research Center for Energy (FORCE) Test Site
Developer:
Start Date:
September 01, 2009
Country:
Technology Type:
Info Updated:
May 02, 2018
The Fundy Ocean Research Center for Energy (FORCE).
Project Status: 
Test site operational
Technology: 
Berths for five in-stream turbines or arrays
Project Scale: 
Test site with five berths for different berth holders
Installed Capacity: 
2.0 MW (22 MW permitted, spread among five berths)
Description: 

The Fundy Ocean Research Centre for Energy (FORCE) was established in 2009 as Canada’s leading test centre for tidal energy technology. FORCE is a non-profit grid-connected test facility in the Minas Passage, Bay of Fundy, intended to allow developers, regulators, scientists, and academics to study and demonstrate the performance of in-stream tidal energy turbines and their interactions with the environment. The FORCE site consists of five undersea berths for tidal in-stream energy conversion devices, subsea power cables that can enable connection of turbines to land-based infrastructure, a subsea data cable, an onshore transformer substation, and a shore-based visitor centre.  The marine portion of the project is located in a Crown Lease Area, 1.6 km by 1 km in area, in the Minas Passage near Black Rock, and the onshore facilities are on leased lands on the West Bay Road approximately 10km West of Parrsboro.

Location: 

FORCE’s test site is in the Minas Passage area of the Bay of Fundy near Black Rock, 10 km west of Parrsboro, Nova Scotia. Minas Passage, only 5 km wide and bordered by basalt cliffs, is the entrance to Minas Basin, the region of the world’s highest tides.

 

At mid-tide, the current in Minas Passage is about 4 cubic km per hour, the same as the estimated combined flow of all the rivers and streams on Earth combined.  With the incoming tide, approximately 14 billion tonnes of sea water flows through Minas Passage into Minas Basin, and central Nova Scotia tilts slightly under the immense load.

Project Timeline: 

The first turbine (OpenHydro Design) was deployed on November 12, 2009 by Nova Scotia Power Inc. The NSPI/OpenHydro turbine was retrieved in December 2010.

 

In November 2017, Cape Sharp Tidal Venture (a joint venture between OpenHydro and Emera) deployed a single two-megawatt turbine at ‘Berth D’ at the FORCE site. In June 2017, the turbine was temporarily retrieved for upgrades, with plans to redeploy in mid-2018. Cape Sharp Tidal Venture has approval to deploy another similar size turbine.

 

The other berth holders at the site are:

  • Berth A:Minas Tidal – a partnership of International Marine Energy and Tocardo turbines (4.0 MW)
  • Berth B: Black Rock Tidal Power - TRITON platform developed by TidalStream, supports 36 lightweight horizontal axis SCHOTTEL STG turbines (5.0 MW)
  • Berth C: Atlantis Operations (Canada) Limited) – in partnership with DP Energy (4.5 MW)
  • Berth E: DP Energy – Andritz turbines (4.5 MW)

 

In 2014, FORCE installed four subsea power cables, which will enable berth holders to connect to the Nova Scotia electrical grid. Each cable has the capacity to transmit 16 MW of electricity to shore.

 

In addition, FORCE has implemented two key programs:

  1. Fundy Advanced Sensor Technology (FAST) Program, which consists of onshore and offshore assets to support research and development and to advance efforts to monitor and characterize the FORCE site. More information: fundyforce.ca/fast
  2. Environmental Effects Monitoring Program (EEMP), which has been in place since 2009 to improve the understanding of the environmental conditions of the site and to test the predictions of the Environmental Assessment. More information: fundyforce.ca/environment.
Licensing Information: 

The complete Environmental Assessment Registration Document for FORCE (Registered on June 17, 2009 under the Nova Scotia Environment Act), including the Terms and Conditions of Approval (issued September 15, 2009) can be viewed at: fundyforce.ca/environment/enviromental-assesment/.

 

FORCE also has a Crown land lease from the Province of Nova Scotia, which allows it to conduct activities at its demonstration site. Berth holders at the FORCE site are selected by the Nova Scotia Department of Energy.

 

Each berth holder is responsible for obtaining all permits and approvals for their individual project. This includes authorizations and/or reviews from Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Transport Canada, and a review of its environmental effects monitoring program by the Nova Scotia Department of Environment.

Key Environmental Issues: 

Physical environment, benthic habitat, fish movement, marine mammals, sea birds, and lobster presence in the Minas Passage; and the impact of turbine-generated noise on marine life.

 

Environmental Webpage: http://fundyforce.ca/environment/

Fundy Ocean Research Center for Energy (FORCE) Test Site is located in Canada.

Baseline Assessment: Fundy Ocean Research Center for Energy (FORCE) Test Site

General Description:

Various studies conducted under the Environmental Effects Monitoring Program (pre-deployment data collection and monitoring) and Research Programs.

ReceptorStudy Description Design and Methods Results Status
  • Physical Environment

Currents, waves and tides

Vessel-mounted, moored, and turbine-mounted ADCPs. X-band radar, tide gauge. Modelling.

Data collection and modelling of currents, turbulence, waves and tides for use by berth holders and scientists

Ongoing
  • Invertebrates

Lobster Tagging Program

The purpose of this work was to determine the year-round use of Minas Passage as a corridor for movement of lobster. Adult American lobster were captured, tagged with VEMCO acoustic transmitters and released back into the Minas Basin. The lobsters were tracked by bottom-mounted acoustic receiver stations deployed in the Minas Passage. Tracking occurred November – December 2011; April – August 2012; and December 2012-October 2013.

Results suggest lobsters in the Minas Basin move through the Minas Passage towards the Minas Channel in the late fall/early winter and may move back eastward in the spring.

 

Some lobsters may remain in the Minas Basin over the winter and move back through the Minas Passage.

Completed
  • Sea and Shorebirds

Visual survey

Data on presence and activity of seabirds in the Minas Passage near the tidal energy project site using shore- and vessel-based visual observation surveys (standard observation protocols).

Annual reports summarizing abundance and patterns since 2009.

Ongoing
  • Marine Mammals

Visual survey

Data on presence and activity of marine mammals in the Minas Passage near the tidal energy project site using shore- and vessel-based visual observation surveys.

Annual reports finding that harbour porpoise is the predominant marine mammal observed, with a few seals.

Ongoing
  • Marine Mammals

Passive Acoustic Monitoring of Cetacean Activity Patterns and Movements

Passive acoustic monitoring of harbour porpoise using C-POD & IcListen hydrophones in the Minas Passage to assess how these vary temporally (with respect to time of day, weeks, months and across years), spatially (within and outside the FORCE test area) and with current patterns (tidal cycles and current velocity).

 

Baseline presence of harbour porpoise around FORCE site and comparison of acoustic devices for monitoring in high flow environments.

Ongoing
  • Benthos

Sonar Surveys

Multibeam sonar survey of berth sites and cable routes.

Characterization of bathymetry, geology and sediment transport and suspended sediments.

Completed
  • Benthos

Environmental Monitoring of Seabed Sediment Stability, Transport and Benthic Habitat

Designed to determine conditions on the bottom after the recovery of the turbine in 2010. A side-scan sonar and towed video camera survey was conducted at a Reference Site and at the location of the test deployment site in 2010. Sonograms and side-scan sonar mosaics were interpreted, compared and contrasted with previously collected multi-beam bathymetry and derived backscatter and slope imagery.

The analysis showed no detectable seabed change at the Reference Site since the original data was collected.

Completed
  • Benthos

Video and Photograph Analysis of Bottom Substrate and Associated Epibenthic Biota

Analysis of video and still photographs taken in 2008-2009 survey to characterize pre-deployment (baseline) benthic habitat within the FORCE test site, including benthic substrate type and macrofaunal biota present.

The survey detected a low number of species present in the FORCE lease area and cable routes, with yellow breadcrumb sponge being the most abundant species.

Completed
  • Fish

Acoustic Tracking of Fish Movements

A multi-year tracking study was conducted to assess the movements of four species of concern that utilize the FORCE test area as a migratory route and for other movements (e.g. foraging) - Atlantic sturgeon, Atlantic salmon, American eel and striped bass. Thirty receiver stations were deployed in the Minas Basin and Passage to detect near year-round animal movements (path, velocity and depth) and behaviour of 386 fish tagged with VEMCO transmitters from 2010-2013.

The report summarizes findings on baseline movement of fish species in the Minas Passage and through the test site. Results show that the corridor for fish migration through the Minas Passage is broad and includes the FORCE test area. The results of this study provided evidence of minor use of the passage by out-migrating American eel and Atlantic salmon smolts and more frequent use of the passage by Atlantic sturgeon and striped bass.

Ongoing
  • Fish

Intertidal Weir Surveys

Fish catches at two commercial fishing weirs in the Minas Basin were recorded to examine the temporal and environmental (e.g. temp, tide height) patterns in the presence and abundance of resident and migratory fishes. Sampling was conducted during April/May – August 2013 near weekly during daytime low tides and day and night sampling was conducted on 14 consecutive low tides in July at one site.

Data collected provides pre-turbine baseline data on many migratory fishes that move in and out of the Minas Passage.

Completed
  • Fish

Hydro-acoustic and Midwater Trawl Surveys

Boat surveys from June to August 2010, using a mid-water trawl and an echosounder fish monitoring system. Echo-sounder system sampled acoustic backscatter from throughout the water column to provide information on fish biomass seasonally and spatially and the fishing was used to identify specific species and sizes of fish likely forming the acoustic targets.

Results indicate presence and relative abundance, of a wide range of fish species which use Minas Passage through the summer and fall.

Completed
  • Water Quality

Oceanographic Measurements

Measurements included water column temperature, salinity and turbidity profiling; suspended sediments.

Information on water transparency, suspended sediment, and water temperature.

Completed
  • Noise

Acoustic monitoring

The goals of this project were to: collect pre-deployment (baseline) data on the ambient acoustic environment in the FORCE test site using fixed hydrophone and to assess and refine mooring designs for acoustic monitoring systems in high flow environments.

The results demonstrate that it is possible to collect ambient and in-stream turbine noise signatures in high flow conditions using a fixed autonomous recorder. Mooring designs were tested and improved.

Completed
  • EMF

Assessment of Potential Ecosystem Effects from Electromagnetic Fields (EMF) Associated with Subsea Power Cables and TISEC Devices in Minas Channel

Review of Current Literature and Assessment of Risk from EMFs on organisms in Minas Passage.

Report presents overview and preliminary evaluation of risk to priority species in Minas Passage.

Completed
Reports and Papers

Studies associated with the EIA and Environmental Effects Monitoring Program are available on the website http://fundyforce.ca/monitoring-and-research/monitoring/

Research

Information about the Fundy Advanced Sensor Technology, see www.fundyforce.ca/fast

Post-Installation Monitoring: Fundy Ocean Research Center for Energy (FORCE) Test Site

ReceptorMonitoring Program Description Design and Methods Results Status
  • Marine Ecology

Fundy Advanced Sensor Technology (FAST) Program

Onshore (MET station, X-band radar) and offshore assets (three subsea platforms)

FAST-1 has been deployed and recovered with an acoustic zooplankton and fish profiler (to assess zooplankton and fish density and depth distribution); FAST-2 will  soon be deployed with a dynamic mount with a Tritech Gemini imaging sonar; and FAST-3 has undergone multiple deployments with an acoustic zooplankton and fish profiler and an autonomous scientific echosounder.

Ongoing
  • Invertebrates

Lobster Catchability Surveys

This study was based on measuring lobster catches within test and control areas using commercial lobster traps, in an attempt to assess potential changes in fishing success as result of the deployment and operation of a tidal turbine. Three surveys were conducted, two in the fall of 2009 (before and after turbine deployment) and one in the spring of 2010.

Lobster fishing is essentially the only commercial fishing activity which occurs in the vicinity of the tidal energy demonstration area. The key results are summarized for the 2009 and 2010 surveys; these include independent statistical results review and recommendations for future surveys.

Completed
  • Invertebrates

Lobster Catchability Surveys

A study of similar methods as described above. The first survey took place during October-November 2017 while the turbine was not present, while a second study is planned during turbine operation.

During the first survey, 48 traps were deployed and had an average daily catch rate from 4.79-8.99 kg lobster/trap.

Ongoing
  • Marine Mammals

Passive Acoustic Monitoring of Cetacean Activity Patterns and Movements

Passive acoustic monitoring of harbour porpoise using C-POD & IcListen hydrophones in the Minas Passage to assess how these vary temporally (with respect to time of day, weeks, months and across years), spatially (within and outside the FORCE test area) and with current patterns (tidal cycles and current velocity).

In 2016 and 2017, porpoises were detected on 98.4% of days. Initial results provide no evidence of permanent avoidance in the mid-field of the turbine, but there was a temporary decline in detection rate post turbine installation (41-46%), likely due to vessel activity.

Ongoing
  • Marine Mammals

Active Acoustic Monitoring of Cetaceans

Active Acoustic Monitoring (AAM) sonar to be used in conjunction with PAM methods to fully understand the likelihood of nearfield interactions at a turbine.

N/AOngoing
  • Benthos

Near-field Benthic Monitoring

To be determined

N/APlanned
  • Fish

Hydro-acoustic Surveys

Use of downward-looking hydro-acoustics to measure fish density and distribution in water column, leading to creation of an encounter probability model. Three 24-hour surveys pre-deployment (May, August, October 2016) and four 24-hour surveys during operation (November 2016, January, March, May 2017). Additional surveys after removal of Cape Sharp turbine (July, August, November 2017).

Preliminary results show no significant effect of the turbine on the density of fish in the mid-field of the turbine or fish vertical distributions. Surveys will continue ~1-2 times per season in 2018.

Ongoing
  • Fish

Active Acoustic Monitoring of Fish

Active Acoustic Monitoring (AAM) sonar to be used in conjunction with PAM methods to fully understand the likelihood of nearfield interactions at a turbine.

N/AOngoing
  • Noise

Acoustic Monitoring

The goal of this program is to collect pre- and post-turbine deployment data on the soundscape of the Minas Passage using different drifting hydrophone configurations. Deployments in October 2016 and March 2017, with more planned in 2018.

Initial results are that the main source of noise is sediment movement associated with tidal flow and nearby vessel activity. March 2017 drifting hydrophones were able to pick up sounds from the OpenHydro turbine.

Ongoing
Reports and Papers

Studies associated with the EIA and Environmental Effects Monitoring Program are available on the website http://fundyforce.ca/monitoring-and-research/monitoring/

Research

Information about the Fundy Advanced Sensor Technology, see www.fundyforce.ca/fast

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