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BaiShakou Tidal Power Station

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Project Site Annex IV

Title: BaiShakou Tidal Power Station
Developer:
Start Date:
August 01, 1978
Research End Date:
December 31, 2011
Country:
Technology Type:
Info Updated:
July 24, 2014
Project Status: 
Device no longer in the water
Project Scale: 
Commercial
Installed Capacity: 
960 kW
Description: 

The tidal station is the second largest in China. The power station in China was put into operation on 1 August 1978 when the first two generators were commissioned. In 1987 another two generators went into operation, followed by a further two in 1987 and it was put into use on 1st August 1978 with the first two generators began to operate in 1984.

Location: 

It is located on the Shandong Peninsula, 20km away from the southeast of Rushan County, China.

Process Status: 

Since the sediment transport processes are changing, the advantage of the physical environment of the tidal power station has been changed.

Key Environmental Issues: 

Efficient measures were implemented to stop sand deposition in the lagoon where the tidal power station is sited, preventing the lagoon from getting old so as to prolong the life of use of the station. A comparative study on devising silt-proof systems was carried out using data from the Baishakou Tide Power plant and envisioned environmental protection to control sedimentation in the tallwater channel and reservoir. Through analysing the data measured out of Baishakou Tide Power Station, reasonable measures were proposed on controlling sediment in tall-water channel and reservoir area and comprehensive management. Engineering facilities, mechanical sand-proof methods, and environmental protection were also considered (Xhikui Zu, 1992; Zhikui Zhu, 1992).

 

Environmental management actions were implemented to deal with sediments deposition. A large area of plants, divided into three parts in different levels: high, middle and low, was planted on the big complex sand dam which is 3km in the east of the eastern sand proof dam.

BaiShakou Tidal Power Station is located in China.

Baseline Assessment: BaiShakou Tidal Power Station

ReceptorStudy Description Design and Methods Results Status
  • Geomorphology

Implementation of measures to stop sand deposition in the lagoon where the tidal power station is sited, preventing the lagoon from getting old so as to prolong the life of use of the station.

A large area of plants, divided into three parts in different levels: high, middle and low, was planted on the big complex sand dam which is 3km in the east of the eastern sand proof dam. On the 1.0–2.0m low beach and dam field, the growing fast and flood and slat-resistant plant Spartina anglica was planted; on the 2.5m middle beach (the supposed level is 1.55m), reed was planted and on the high beach, trees were planted. In addition, west to the sea entrance of the newly built Baishakou mouth, a short hook-shaped dam has been built as a barrier.

Spartina anglica in the low beach and dam fields not only prevents sediment from being washed away by wave and wind, but also provides feed for cow and sheep, and bait for fish. Furthermore, it accelerates the growing period of reed in the middle beach, which is used as building materials and fuel, and forms a green scenery environment together with the dense trees on the high beach. Such kind of engineering facilities and biological measures coordinates in harmony, preventing the sediment of Baishakou River to obstruct the sea entrance of the new river route and the sediment to silt up far away from the tide power station.

Completed
Reports and Papers
Research

N/A

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