Annex IV distributes metadata forms (questionnaires) to solicit information from researchers around the world who are exploring the environmental effects of marine renewable energy. This page provides a description and contact information related to the research. Content is updated on an annual basis.

Field Based Experimental Studies of Marine Organism Response to Electromagnetic Field (EMF) Associated with Marine Renewable Energy Devices: Understanding the Environmental Impacts

Research Study Annex IV

Title: Field Based Experimental Studies of Marine Organism Response to Electromagnetic Field (EMF) Associated with Marine Renewable Energy Devices: Understanding the Environmental Impacts
Researcher:
Start Date:
January 01, 2007
Research End Date:
January 01, 2012
Country:
Stressor:
Receptor:
Technology Type:
Info Updated:
November 29, 2016
Study Status: 
Completed
Princple Investigator Contact Information: 

Name: Andrew Gill

Address: School Of Applied Sciences Building 56b, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL, U.K.

Phone: +44 (0)1234750111 x2711

Email: a.b.gill@cranfield.ac.uk

Project Description: 

To determine whether EMF can be detected and responded to by EM-sensitive species, using benthic elasmobranchs as the indicators owing to their high sensitivity to EMF.

Funding Source: 

COWRIE – offshore wind environmental fund; NERC – UK Research Council; Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

Location of Research: 

Cranfield University and Ardtoe, Ardnamurchan, West Scotland.

Project Aims: 

To determine whether EMF can be detected and responded to by EM-sensitive species using benthic elasmobranchs as the indicators owing to their high sensitivity to EMF.

Project Progress: 

This research concluded in 2012.

Key Findings: 
  • S.canicula were found to non-randomly associate nearer to the cables when energized.
  • R. clavata individuals exhibit a response to the EMF from an energized cable; the response is variable and was not predictable
  • Acoustic telemetry techniques can provide a coarse level understanding of individual fish response to specific stressors
  • The use of large scale experimentation through mesocosms (40m x 5m), replicate studies and the inclusion of a control are a feasible way of understanding environmental effects at a scale appropriate to the marine renewable energy sector.
Related Publications: 
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